Duvaliers

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Duvaliers
Duvaliers.JPG

First reference: It Takes a Village, Part 1
"Duvaliers" on Wikipedia

The Duvaliers (François and his son Jean-Claude) led Haiti for many years.

References

Graphic Novel:It Takes a Village, Part 1

The Haitian remembers that when he was a child, Haiti "was dying, strangling in the grip of the Duvaliers". The leader of the country, Jean-Claude Duvalier, keeps a private militia called the Tonton Macoutes, who terrorize Guillame's village.

Notes

  • Both François and Jean-Claude were considered brutal dictators. They used the Tonton Macoutes to solidify their power.
  • Some estimate that up to 30,000 Haitians were killed under François's reign.
  • François served 14 years in office from 1957 until his death in 1971.
  • Jean-Claude took over his father's position at age 19 and served for 15 years as head of state.
  • Following a civil uprising and pressure from the Reagan administration to renounce his rule, Jean-Claude was unceremoniously exiled to France.
  • Given the Haitian's young age in 1992 (Company Man), it is likely that the events of the It Takes a Village series take place in the early 1980s or late 1970s, and the Duvalier to whom the Haitian refers is Jean-Claude. In an interview, Joe Kelly said the story takes place "about 20 years ago, give or take."
  • François often took on the guise of Baron Samedi, the Loa of the dead who stood at the crossroads between the earth and spirit worlds.

Trivia

  • François was often called "Papa Doc", and Jean-Claude was nicknamed "Baby Doc".
  • In 1983, Pope John Paul II visited Jean-Claude's country and declared, "Something must change here."
  • 15 years after François's death, a mob of Haitians set out to beat the deceased leader's corpse. They were unsuccessful in finding the body, so they beat the body of one of his supporters instead.


References to People edit

Charles DarwinDuvaliersBob DylanAlbert EinsteinSigmund FreudFriedrich NietzscheWilliam Shakespeare

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