Tokyo subway

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Tokyo subway
Tokyo subway portal.JPG
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Purpose: Transportation

Hiro evidences his unique powers aboard the Tokyo subway.

Notable Visitors

About

Genesis

At Yamagato Industries, Hiro tells a skeptical Ando that it was his powers that must have made the subway train 14 seconds late that morning. After work, Hiro and Ando discuss the ability to manipulate space and time on the escalator of the subway station. Later, Hiro stands in a subway car and notices a poster advertising New York City. He closes his eyes to concentrate, and the subway clock begins to change. Suddenly, he's in Times Square.

Don't Look Back

Hiro stands in the train and teleports to New York. After witnessing the explosion, Hiro teleports back to the subway in Tokyo.

Graphic Novel:The Crane

Hiro teleports back to the subway. He is happily surprised to find himself alive.

Jump, Push, Fall

An advertisement for the Tokyo subway is visible in the background of the Sullivan Bros. Carnival when then visit Tokyo in 1993.

Heroes Evolutions

Saving Charlie

  • Hiro takes the subway home after stopping time at work. While on the train, Hiro watches a monitor playing an advertisement for "Vacations in New York City". While watching the monitor, Hiro teleports to New York in the future. (Chapter 3)
  • Hiro thinks that Midland-Odessa's public transportation system rivals Tokyo's "sprawling, tangled subways for confusion and complications". (Chapter 8)
  • Hiro recalls being in the Tokyo subway one second, heading home from a karaoke bar, and in Times Square the next second. (Chapter 17)
  • At the Narita Airport, Hiro buys a gift for Charlie—at first he considers buying a T-shirt printed with a picture of the Nippori subway station. (Chapter 22)

Trivia

  • The poster of New York City that spurs Hiro to think of the city is the same poster that hangs on the warehouse door at Jittetsu Arms.
  • For filming, the Los Angeles Red Line is used in place of the Tokyo subway. In the commentary for the unaired pilot, Tim Kring said that they simply put some Japanese signage up in an American train car then filled it with extras who looked like they would belong in a Japanese subway. They even were specific about details like the fact that the handrails on Japanese subways swing rather than stay stationary.

Gallery

External Links


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